CyberChain Review  –  Ponzi Scheme –  MLM Scam

Website & Company Information

The web domain of the company was registered on the 11th of August 2020. The website does not provide any information about who owns or runs the company, in fact, the front end looks similar to a registration form.

The domain information portal popped up ‘Swisscoin’ as the owner of the domain. Swisscoin was a Ponzi scheme that was launched back in 2016. With regards to domain registration, Andreas Kartrud has used SwissCoin on the registration of several domains this year.

Many independent reviewers have termed him as a ‘serial scammer’ because he has been involved with numerous scam in the past. Some of the popular bad names include:

  • Shopping Sherlock
  • SwissCoin
  • Dominant Finance
  • WoToken
  • Up2Give
  • KryptoGlobe
  • 1 Click Trading
  • XOXO Network
  • EtherChain
  • TronChain

As always, if the company is not being transparent about its corporate structure, then you must think twice before handing over your hard-earned money to anonymous people on the internet.

CyberChain’s Products

The company has no retailable products or services, with affiliates only able to market CyberChain affiliate membership itself.

CyberChain’s Compensation Plan

To participate in CyberChain compensation plan, one must invest a minimum of 100 Tron. CyberChain has a twelve-tier 3×2 matrix cycler that pays the ROI.

Now, what is a 3 x 2 matrix cycler? The following explanation might help you:

It is a system that places the affiliate at the top of the matrix. So in case of this 3×2 matrix, the affiliates will have three positions directly under them.

The said three positions form the first level of the said 3 x 2 matrix. Then, the second level of the 3×2 matrix is generated by splitting these first three positions into another three positions each (9 positions)

In total, a 3×2 matrix houses twelve positions.

Positions in the matrix are filled via direct and indirect recruitment of CyberChain affiliates, who each invest 100 Tron.

For each position filled in the matrix, 50% of the 100 Tron buy-in is paid as a commission.

This works out to 600 Tron, of which 100 Tron is used to generate a new tier 1 cycler position.

This process is referred to as a “cycle”. Each tier 1 cycle pays an effective 500 Tron return off an initial 100 tron investment.

CyberChain’s eleven other matrix cycler tiers operate in the same manner.

The only thing that changes from tier to tier is the amount of tron invested:

  • Tier 2 — invest 200 TRX and get 1000 TRX and a new tier 2 cycler position
  • Tier 3 — invest 400 TRX and get 2000 TRX and a new tier 3 cycler position
  • Tier 4 — invest 800 TRX and get 4000 TRX and a new tier 4 cycler position
  • Tier 5 — invest 1600 TRX and get 8000 TRX and a new tier 5 cycler position
  • Tier 6 — invest 3200 TRX and get 16,000 TRX and a new tier 6 cycler position
  • Tier 7 — invest 6400 TRX and get 32,000 TRX and a new tier 7 cycler position
  • Tier 8 — invest 19,200 TRX and get 96,000 TRX and a new tier 8 cycler position
  • Tier 9 — invest 57,600 TRX and get 288,000 TRX and a new tier 9 cycler position
  • Tier 10 — invest 172,800 TRX and get 864,000 TRX and a new tier 10 cycler position
  • Tier 11 — invest 518,400 TRX and get 2,592,000 TRX and a new tier 11 cycler position
  • Tier 12 — invest 1,555,200 TRX and get 7,776,000 TRX and a new tier 12 cycler position

Joining CyberChain

Joining CyberChain affiliate membership requires a minimum investment of 100 TRX. However, full participation in the attached income opportunity requires 2,335,900 TRX.

Conclusion

We conclude Kartrud is clearly employing funds from newly launched Ponzi schemes to put off the inevitable. He has launched multiple Ponzi schemes this year, maybe because he is jobless due to the Pandemic. Someone needs to take note of this guy and stop him from exploiting innocent people on the internet.

The end result, however, remains the same; Those at the bottom of EtherChain, TronChain and CyberChain will lose money.